clandestiny

The Liquid Way

"For journeying between Westminster and the Tower, and between the Tower and Greenwich, the Thames was especially the royal road. The first Lord Mayor who went to Westminster by water was John Norman in 1454, and the pageant has been since kept up for more than four centuries, having been continued until 1857; in 1858 the aquatic portion of the ceremonial was discontinued. Stow computes that in his time there were 40,000 watermen upon the rolls of the company, and that they could furnish 20,000 men for the fleet. Great quantities of fruit that were formally brought to the London market, through the agency of the boats that turn plied upon its 'liquid way.' Steele pleasantly describes a boat trip from Richmond on an early summer morning, when he 'fell in with a fleet of gardeners,' and 'landed with ten sail of apricock boats at Strand Bridge (stairs), after having put in at Nine Elms and taken in Melons.' Such an arrival now would create no ordinary sensation at Covent Garden Market. Probably the last relic of going by water to places of amusement on the banks of the Thames was the voyage in small boats to Vauxhall Gardens, which to the present day have their 'watergate.' In 1737, this favourite mode of locomotion was thus graphically referred to:--'Lolling in state with one on either sideAnd gently pulling with the wind and tideLast night, the evening of a sultry day, We sail'd triumphant on the liquid way,To hear the fiddlers of Spring Gardens play.'"-Bradshaw's Illustrated Handbook to London and its Environs 1862 Model of city barge, 1807 by Searle and Godfrey of Stangate, Lambeth for the Corporation of London
"For journeying between Westminster and the Tower, and between the Tower and Greenwich, the Thames was especially the royal road. The first Lord Mayor who went to Westminster by water was John Norman in 1454, and the pageant has been since kept up for more than four centuries, having been continued until 1857; in 1858 the aquatic portion of the ceremonial was discontinued. Stow computes that in his time there were 40,000 watermen upon the rolls of the company, and that they could furnish 20,000 men for the fleet. Great quantities of fruit that were formally brought to the London market, through the agency of the boats that turn plied upon its 'liquid way.' Steele pleasantly describes a boat trip from Richmond on an early summer morning, when he 'fell in with a fleet of gardeners,' and 'landed with ten sail of apricock boats at Strand Bridge (stairs), after having put in at Nine Elms and taken in Melons.' Such an arrival now would create no ordinary sensation at Covent Garden Market. Probably the last relic of going by water to places of amusement on the banks of the Thames was the voyage in small boats to Vauxhall Gardens, which to the present day have their 'watergate.' In 1737, this favourite mode of locomotion was thus graphically referred to:-- 'Lolling in state with one on either side And gently pulling with the wind and tide Last night, the evening of a sultry day, We sail'd triumphant on the liquid way, To hear the fiddlers of Spring Gardens play.'" -Bradshaw's Illustrated Handbook to London and its Environs 1862 Model of city barge, 1807 by Searle and Godfrey of Stangate, Lambeth for the Corporation of London

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